These are dangerous animals


From Manager, June 27, 2014
Junta chief Gen. Prayuth Chan-och: Try keeping these animals in your parliaments for just a day… and you’ll understand why the Thai people don’t want elections.
Caption: The easiest way to make foreigners understand [Note the long-nosed foreigners next to BBC and CNN cameras in the foreground.]

[“Tiger-lion-bull-rhinoceros” is a Thai saying that refers to wily and experienced people who are likely to take advantage of a situation to reap rewards for themselves and thus are dangerous to be around. The “tiger-lion-bull-rhinoceros” reference is most often used to symbolize and denigrate Thai politicians who are rarely “common man” types one assumes could run for office in developed nations.

Thai political parties are required to be of a certain size and capitalized with a certain amount of money. Thai MPs are almost always provincial kingpins (local business tycoons, the prominent family in a region, or simply the local mafia boss) with the money and influence to make a place for themselves in these political parties dominated by tycoons. The era of a common man being able to run for office on his own remains a far-off fantasy.

Thus, it is easy to see how some might see Thai political life as the venue for influence peddlers and the power hungry wishing to reap benefits for themselves and their families.]

Some other “Tiger-lion-bull-rhinoceros” references in recent years:

2011: Tiger-lion-bull-rhinoceros headed figures for new year’s

2011: Tiger-Lion-Bull-Rhinoceros enter parliament

2011: Pre-election billboard: “Don’t let these animals into parliament!”

2011: Wild animals escaping parliament

2013: Thaksin and the Fierce Animals

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