A tale of two newspapers: Privy Councillor Prem “rebukes” Thaksin

The Nation leads with this story and stresses that it is 'a major rebuke' to the PM's 'heavy-handed approach.' The Post blandly and carefully reports Prem's comments on page three without any reference to the PM.
Prem: Unrest solutions lie in royal advice - Bangkok Post, March 1, 2005 ... Gen Prem said applying the King's advice was the best approach because it was pure, unbiased and filled with compassion and care. He said it was also necessary, however, that the advice be properly understood. "The problems in the deep South are similar to waging war. So it is necessary to know exactly who the enemies are, where they are and what are their strategies and goals,'' he said... He suggested the government stick to the rule of laws, social rules, love and legitimacy without bias to help solve problems in the three largely Muslim provinces of Yala, Pattani and Narathiwat. He said it was not right that Thai Muslims were being treated like second-class citizens... [2015 note: Like many Thai newspaper articles from the early days of the Thai internet, this article is no longer online. Below is the complete text of the original article.] Prem: Unrest solutions lie in royal advice ANUCHA CHAROENPO Gen Prem Tinsulanonda, president of the Privy Council, has urged organisations concerned with finding solutions to the southern violence to put His Majesty the King's advice into practice. Gen Prem said applying the King's advice was the best approach because it was pure, unbiased and filled with compassion and care. He said it was also necessary, however, that the advice be properly understood. ``The problems in the deep South are similar to waging war. So it is necessary to know exactly who the enemies are, where they are and what are their strategies and goals,'' he said. He was speaking at a seminar on ``Collaboration in Solving Unrest in the South of Thailand Based on Royal Advice'', jointly held by the Foundation for International Human Resource Development and Thammasat University, at the Chulabhorn Research Institute yesterday. Gen Prem highlighted the salient points of royal advice _ Understand, Access and Develop _ and told participants comprising southern community leaders, state officials, academics and NGOs, that those who will apply the advice to their work must study it carefully. Then they would have the same understanding and speak the same language. He suggested the government stick to the rule of laws, social rules, love and legitimacy without bias to help solve problems in the three largely Muslim provinces of Yala, Pattani and Narathiwat. He said it was not right that Thai Muslims were being treated like second-class citizens. Privy Councillor Kasem Wattanachai said the King has ruled the country for 60 years. Hence, there was much advice which people could apply as ``principles of thought'' to better their lives and improve the lives of those in the South. Chaiwat Satha-anant, a political scientist from Thammasat University, said he had spoken with some people in the deep South and found they were not interested in the zoning of villages into red, yellow and green areas. ``They know only red, white and blue in this country,'' he said, referring to the three colours of Thai flag which stand for nation, religion and the king, respectively. Other participants also called on the government to stop fighting violence with violent means in the deep South, and to allow local Muslims to have more say in how to run their own lives. SOUTHERN CONFLICT: PM should ‘adopt Royal approach’ - The Nation, March 1, 2005 ...In a major rebuke to Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra’s current heavy-handed approach to settling the southern conflict, two top Privy Council members have urged the government to adopt the Royal approach, which focuses on pacifist and development-oriented means. General Prem Tinsulanonda, chair of the Privy Council and a former prime minister, did not mince words in his opening speech during a workshop on “Collaboration in Solving Problems in Southern Thailand according to the Royal Approaches”. He referred to the situation in Yala, Narathiwat and Pattani as having worsened since January 4 of last year... He went on to say that when a problem is misrepresented, it becomes increasingly difficult to formulate a solution. “Instead of solving the problem, it adds to the problem,” he added... [2015 note: Like many Thai newspaper articles from the early days of the Thai internet, this article is no longer online. Below is the complete text of the original article.] SOUTHERN CONFLICT: PM should "adopt Royal approach" Published on March 01, 2005 Privy Councillors stress the importance of development, understanding, accessibility In a major rebuke to Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra's current heavy-handed approach to settling the southern conflict, two top Privy Council members have urged the government to adopt the Royal approach, which focuses on pacifist and development-oriented means. General Prem Tinsulanonda, chair of the Privy Council and a former prime minister, did not mince words in his opening speech during a workshop on “Collaboration in Solving Problems in Southern Thailand according to the Royal Approaches”. He referred to the situation in Yala, Narathiwat and Pattani as having worsened since January 4 of last year. “Whichever organisations want to settle the problem must know what is really going on. They must also know correctly the problem they are going to resolve,” Prem said. He went on to say that when a problem is misrepresented, it becomes increasingly difficult to formulate a solution. “Instead of solving the problem, it adds to the problem,” he added. In handling the southern conflict, he said it was imperative for the government to stress accessibility (khao thueng), understanding (khao jai) and development (pattana). Daily violence has become a common occurrence over the past year, with more than 600 officials and civilians killed. Prem, who served as prime minister from 1980 to 1988, presided over a calmer period in southern Thailand, when the government’s olive branches were well received by disenchanted groups. He dismissed the allegation that Thai Buddhists look at Thai Muslims as second-class citizens. “It is not true, on the contrary, we are all Thais and we are equal,” he said. He said that the rule of law must be the foundation of an effective resolution in the deep South, along with good will and impartiality. The workshop yesterday also featured a lecture from Dr Kasem Wattanachai, another Privy Council member, who spoke of the wisdom of Their Majesties. He quoted His Majesty the King for most of his presentation and said that problems in the deep South should be approached with this wisdom. He reiterated that solving the southern conflict required using the experience of many parties in a collaborative process. He reiterated that the southern conflict needed experience and collaboration with others. “To disown other people’s intellect is tantamount to ignoring the existing foundation which can be useful,” he said without elaboration. Throughout his presentation, Kasem was passionate in highlighting HM the King’s wisdom contained in various speeches over the past two decades. Thailand is the land of equals and all Thais are united, he said. Recently, General Surayud Chulanont, another Privy Council member, criticised Thaksin’s zoning policy in the South as divisive and unconstitutional. He said that Thai-Muslims had been mistreated and that the authorities must listen to locals. Suphon Thanukrit
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