Inside the Rama 9 Subway Station


(Photo: 2Bangkok.com)
Detail of a station entrance

July 3, 2003


(Photo: 2Bangkok.com)
Entrance to the station Ratchadapeisek Road

(Photo: 2Bangkok.com)
The stairway down into the station


(Photo: 2Bangkok.com)
Behind the door are plates that can be installed to create an additioanl 1-meter high barrier at the station entrance in case of flood.
Most of the granite and metal used in the station


(Photo: 2Bangkok.com)
"No maked light" probably means "No open/naked flame."


(Photo: 2Bangkok.com)
Across the darkened station top level. On the far side is the exit to the opposite side of Ratchadapeisek Road.


(Photo: 2Bangkok.com)
Station control office and to the left are empty alcoves ready for ticketing machines to be installed.

(Photo: 2Bangkok.com)
Spuds for ticketing turnstiles to be installed.


(Photo: 2Bangkok.com)
The ticketing level. On the lower right are the mounting areas for the ticketing turnstiles


(Photo: 2Bangkok.com)
Each station has a symbol. All the symbols are here.


(Photo: 2Bangkok.com)
Escalators to the platform level. Note the curved suspended ceiling above and the station symbol (a Thai "9") in the background.


(Photo: 2Bangkok.com)
A small display on the ticketing level describes the the cut and cover method used to excavate the stations.


(Photo: 2Bangkok.com)
First prediction: The clocks will have to be raised. The clocks hang extremely low and are easily reachable by people of average height.


(Photo: 2Bangkok.com)
Details of the hanging clocks and the suspended ceiling

(Photo: 2Bangkok.com)


(Photo: 2Bangkok.com)
The only discernible detailing in the very nondescript station design are in the suspended ceiling.


(Photo: 2Bangkok.com)

(Photo: 2Bangkok.com)
Details of the suspended ceiling


(Photo: 2Bangkok.com)
Escalators down to the platform level.


(Photo: 2Bangkok.com)
The platform level - To the right are where the platform doors will be installed in the future.
Temporary walls have been put up so that the air-conditioning system can be tested.


(Photo: 2Bangkok.com)
A makeshift guard station on the platform level


(Photo: 2Bangkok.com)
The south end of the station where the station connects to the tunnel going towards the Petchburi Road Station. Directly above where these people are standing is a large air ventilation shaft.

(Photo: 2Bangkok.com)
This is where the ventilation shaft exits at street level at the corner of Ratchadapeisek Road and Rama 9 Road (Ahsawmahtaw Intersection).

(Photo: 2Bangkok.com)
The excavation of the tunnels was also started from this point. Above is the cutter blade about to be lowered into the dig site on the same corner in May, 1999. The excavation machine previous dug the subway in Taipei and is presently digging the subway in new Delhi.


(Photo: 2Bangkok.com)
The expansion ring between the station and the tunnel
The subway is built to last for 120 years and there is room for expansion/contraction between the station and tunnel.
There is another photo of this 'Omega Ring' in the Morchit Station on this page.
A benchmark depth for the entire system is a point about 200 meters under Lumpini Park.


(Photo: 2Bangkok.com)
The subway tunnel looking towards the Petchburi Road Station


(Photo: 2Bangkok.com)
The third rail (that carries the electricity) is still being installed.


(Photo: 2Bangkok.com)
The tracks and third rail looking back towards the station platform


(Photo: 2Bangkok.com)
Detail of the tunnel walls and their "banana bolts" that connect panel to panel. The pressure of the earth holds the tunnel together.
The "banana bolts" can be completely removed, but it is cheaper to leave them in.


(Photo: 2Bangkok.com)
Bracketing under the walkway in the tunnel ready for wiring.


(Photo: 2Bangkok.com)
Back on the ticketing level


(Photo: 2Bangkok.com)
Escalators up to street level


(Photo: 2Bangkok.com)
Detail of the roof of a station entrance


(Photo: 2Bangkok.com)


(Photo: 2Bangkok.com)
Edge of a station with wires and Fortune Town shopping mall in the background


(Photo: 2Bangkok.com)
A street person who washes the windows of stopped cars taking a nap.


(Photo: 2Bangkok.com)
Another detail of a station entrance

This entry was posted in Subway. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.