Loy Krathong 2005


(Photo: 2Bangkok.com)

Loy Krathong 2005 - November 16, 2005
Above: Blue waterfall at Benjakitti Water Park
Below: Wind and rain did not deter the festival at Benjakitti Water Park

Also: Loy Krathong 2003 and Loy Krathong 2004


(Photo: 2Bangkok.com)

(Photo: 2Bangkok.com)

(Photo: 2Bangkok.com)


(Photo: 2Bangkok.com)
Loy Krathong party in a ghost building? - November 16, 2005
At 9:43pm from Benjakitti Water Park we noticed a few lights on in the long vacant ghost building at the corner of Sukhumvit and Rachadapeisek Roads.

(Photo: 2Bangkok.com)


(Photo: 2Bangkok.com)

Above: Mahakan Fort and the Golden Mount on Loy Krathong night

Loy Krathong is tonight - November 16, 2005
Tonight is Loy Krathong, a major Thai festival where people place small decorated floats into canals and rivers while making a wish. In recent times, Loy Krathong has become more and more associated with a night of romance between young people and each year the public increasingly frets about sexual activity on Loy Krathong night.
Another change in recent years has been the near elimination--at least in Bangkok--of the reckless fireworks that used to be shot off in and around the crowds at the water's edge. (Fireworks used to be sold behind the old city wall at Mahakan Fort--sometimes they can still be seen for sale there.)
Environmentalism has also played a part in Loy Krathong the last decade as city governments first banned the use of foam to construct krathongs and then a subsequent Bangkok Governor encouraged the use of foam. The current city government is back to discouraging foam and other non-biodegradable materials. Loy Krathong night is also one of the worst traffic nights of the year.
Photos of the festival: Loy Krathong 2003 and Loy Krathong 2004


Loy Krathong described in 1966 - November 16, 2005
Note there are two Loy Krathong days and a 'mouthful of betel nut and betel leaf' is added to the krathong...
(from Bangkok Bulletin, No. 657, Monday, December 12, 1966) The full moon night of the eleventh and twelfth lunar months, i.e. in the later parts of October and November, are the days of "LOY KRATHONG" or the floating of light in a leaf cup. Some of the krathongs are not leaf cups at all, in the ordinary sense of the word. Generally, some of them are in the shape of a bird or a boat. They are more of a toy than a krathongs, and have only made their appearance in recent years. Usually in a "krathong," apart from a candle and one or more incense sticks, a small coin, say a five-stang piece, is also put in, and sometimes a mouthful of betel nut and betel leaf for a chewing purpose is added. In the evening, when the full moon begins to rise in the months of October and November, the people carry one or two krathongs to the edge of the water. After the candle and incense sticks in the krathong are lighted, they let it go gently on the surface of the placid water. A few folk will sometimes raise their hands in worship, they watch the krathong as they float sluggishly along the water for some time until they float far away out of sight.


Info needed - November 16, 2005
We are looking for sources concerning the following: Before the 1980's Loy Krathong was a regional festival held mainly in the Sukothai area (or Chiang Mai?). At some point national tourism authorities decided to promote it as a national festival, causing annoyance from Sukothai officials who felt their festival was being 'stolen.' We remember articles about his from the early 1990s...


Loy Krathong in 1981 - November 21, 2005
Heinrich writes: Concerning your "Info needed - November 16, 2005" about Loy Krathong before the 1980's. I don't know if you can use this information, this was my first Loy Krathong ever: I remember a really wonderful celebration of Loy Krathong on 11. November 1981 in Bangkok in Lumpini Park. It was very(!) crowded. In and around the park you could buy lots of ready-made khratongs, much styrofoam but also natural materials were available. Young boys were diving in the lake to get the small coins that were hidden in the khratongs. Around the lake were many hawkers, which sold all this delicious staff that I like Thai celebrations for. Most of the food was wrapped in banana-leaves - no plastic like today, and you could sit on big mats on the floor while eating, watching the other people enjoy themselves... Have a look at this photo from that day...


(Photo: 2Bangkok.com)

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