Phan Phiphop Lila Bridge & intersection over the years



Photo circa 1903 - Procession passing the prison for Minor Crimes (Kong Lahuthot). Note the prison tower on the left. It seems at this time there is no bridge at the intersection. The trees around Sanam Luang (right) were planted in 1902.


(Photo: 2Bangkok.com)

Phan Phiphop Lila Bridge & intersection over the years

2Bangkok.com has been collecting images of the Phan Phiphop Lila bridge and intersection for several years. This is the bridge right before Sanam Luang. It is barely noticeable today as roads have almost completely covered the area around the bridge and the canal is now largely underground.

A sign at the site reads: "Phan Phiphop Lila Bridge - built by Rama V in 1906 to pair with Makkhawan Rangsan Bridge (at the end of Ratchadamnoen Klang Avenue)... Actually the original banisters were very beautiful, unfortunately they were taken to nowhere during the repairation..."

Photo circa 1906 - Notice the power or telephone poles (one is visible right behind the car). The prison for Minor Crimes (Kong Lahuthot) occupies the space where the Earth Goddess statue and the Ministry of Justice will later be built.

Another early image of the intersection (right). This photo has (from left to right), a horse and carriage, a car, and a rickshaw.


(Photo: Undated photo from the 2Bangkok.com collection)

A friend bought this photo (left) for 15 baht from a little old lady sitting under a walkway at Victory Monument. It is on extremely waterlogged and yellowed paper with nothing on the back.


(Photo: Postcard from Vichit Turtivong's uncopyrighted Classic Postcards "Siam")

By this time, the Rama V era, the prison has been removed and the Earth Goddess statue has been erected (sometime before 1910). It was initially used as public water tap during a time flooding as a source of clean water. It was built with the donation from Queen Mother Saovabhaphongsri of King Vajiravut [Queen Saowabha of King Chulalongkorn]. The trees around Sanam Luang have grown and there is a boat in the klong.

This photo of the Rattanakosin Hotel (later the Royal Hotel) is from the post-war aerial survey of Bangkok taken by Peter Williams Hunt (circa 1946). By this time a new bridge has been built (bottom center of the photo) and the original ornate ironwork has disappeared.

Postwar aerial survey of Bangkok taken by Peter Williams Hunt (circa 1946). Rattanakosin Hotel is on the right. A department store is on the other corner. Later that building will be the Public Relations Department before being replaced by the Revenue Department building which is built out into the road. In 1991, the Revenue Department building was burned down and then removed. Note: The apparent bridge over the river in the top left of the photo is actually part of the plane.


(Photo: Undated postcard from the 2Bangkok.com collection)

Undated photo of Ratanakosin Hotel


(Photo: ThaiRath newspaper photo)

Thairath newspaper photo from the 1973 protests shows the Revenue Department building on the right.


(Photo: ThaiRath newspaper photo)

Thairath newspaper photo from the 1973 protests show the Revenue Department building on the right. Ratchadamneon Avenue has been routed around the building which sticks out into the former route of the road.

Screen grab from footage of the 1973 protests showing the Revenue Department in the center of the road.

Screen grab from footage of the 1973 protests showing the Revenue Department and the National Theater in the background


(Photo: 2Bangkok.com)

2004 - With the Revenue Department building gone, there is a clear, unobstructed view to the National Theater

 

Blurry photo from the mid-1990s showing a planter in the middle of Phan Phiphop Lila bridge.


(Photo: 2Bangkok.com)

A new statue erected at the intersection in 2003.


(Photo: 2Bangkok.com)

2004 - Standing on Phan Phiphop Lila Bridge looking towards Sanam Luang


(Photo: 2Bangkok.com)

2004 - Above and below: More modern-day views of the intersection and bridge


(Photo: 2Bangkok.com)


(Photo: 2Bangkok.com)
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